A Palette of Pastels Permeate Prolifically Within This Japanese Apartment

Multidisciplinary London-based designer Adam Nathaniel Furman’s portfolio glows unabashedly with a passion for color and pattern, a body of work recently and most wonderfully exemplified by a residential project completed in Nagatacho – the governmental administrative district of central Tokyo – for a client who offered carte blanche to explore.

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Orchestrating a symphony of pastels, Furman transformed the client’s 160-square meter flat of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and a large communal living area with terrace into an imaginative graphical interior landscape where colors harmonize and gently vibrate in proximity, realizing an “architecture that luxuriates in a hyper-aestheticized celebration of the senses, and of every-day domestic life.”

Arne Jacobsen’s Drop Chairs blend into splendidly within the candyland interior. \ Photo: Adam Nathaniel Furman

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Adam Nathaniel Furman

The expression of color should come as no surprise from one of the co-founders of Saturated Space, a research organization based within the Architectural Association School of Architecture in Bedford Square, London, and responsible for organizing symposiums and sharing, exploration, and celebration of color in Architecture.

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

The Nagatacho apartment is an experiment in the euphoric connoisseurship of color, texture, material and form in the theatre of the quotidian, a space that elevates the client’s daily rituals and communal activities into a space of continuously seductive aesthetic delectation.

– Adam Nathaniel Furman/designer

The proximity of textured wallpaper alongside semi-matte plastic wall finishes present a subtle and pleasing contrast. \ Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Photo: Jan Vranovsky

Obviously such a resplendent space is not intended for all, but the Nagatacho residence by Adam Nathaniel Furman offers a joyous alternative to the spare and minimalist spaces typically associated with modernity today – a colorful rebellion expressed in a grammar of pigment.