Numen/For Use and Prostoria Collaborate on Lowlife and Loop Sofas

Numen/For Use has become known for creating interactive public installations using adhesive tape, ropes, and carpet that visitors are encouraged to climb, clamber, and hide within. They loosely resemble furniture and are designed by Sven Jonke, Christoph Katzler, and Nikola Radeljković – who are also furniture designers behind the Numen/For Use collective.

Recently Numen/For Use showed their collaboration with award-winning brand Prostoria. They were given free reign to design integrated solutions that blur the line between experimental architecture and designer furniture, the result is two new systems of modular furniture – Lowlife and Loop.

“Both projects, in a way, result from our research into the potential of novel interpretations of concepts related to informal space and unconventional social relations typical of the countercultural movements in the late 1960s,” explains designer Sven Jonke, from the Numen/For Use collective.

Lowlife’s system combines varying backrest heights with three different seat depths for a fully customized lounging experience that features slightly rounded edges with futuristic undertones. Loop’s interconnected seats and poufs unfold to reveal angled surfaces just right for lounging, leisure, and socializing. Prosteria is one of few global furniture makers entitled to use upholstery by Danish brand Kvadrat, meaning Lowlife and Loop come in textiles by Raf Simons, Artistic Director of Jill Sander, Christian Dior, and Calvin Klein.

“Both systems presented in Milan feature the currently underrepresented low-sitting. For this reason, they are pitched under the slogan Lowlife is better than highlife. With this launch, we want to step out of our comfort zone, make something less commercial and appeal to younger generations,” highlights architect Biljana Angelovski, from Prostoria.